Internet Vs Playground

66139845.FLWA87iq.ScaryPlaygroundBW.jpgIn the first weeks topic ‘The Internet And Now’, we compared the internet to a playground which I found really intriguing. The fact that there are two sides to the playground; positive and negative.

On one hand the Internet is positive, just like a playground we can develop our social skills as on the Internet we are constantly interacting with others. We can also improve our knowledge on the Internet by researching content and exploring the web whereas on a playground you can improve your knowledge by learning how to explore the different obstacles etc. Online we have instant access as by the click of a button we can find things out, socialise or express our opinions.

However a playground and the Internet have a negative side to them. One of the many: there are no rules, in a playground children can hurt themselves or get in fights as there is no supervision or rules to follow and it is the same with the Internet. Individuals can post horrible things online and do whatever they like because there is nothing to stop them. The Internet is very unsupervised and so can a playground be which is not good because children could get hurt. Also online children may go on content that is not appropriate for them under no supervision which may upset or effect them in some way. Even though I mentioned instant access is positive it can also be looked upon as a negative due to children being able to look at content so easily that is not suitable fro them e.g gaming sites, pornography etc.

Overall this argument really interested me and made me realise we can compare it to different things which made me think about the Internet in a whole new way.

Netflix

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Netflix is a global streaming movies and TV series provider. It started as an American DVD mail service but moved online in 2007 and is now streaming to 109 countries with 75 million subscribers. Although you get a free month trial after that has ended then you have to pay a monthly fee for the content. There are 3 different packages available which are: basic (£5,99), standard (£7.49) and premium (£8.99).

If Netflix were under a Creative Commons licence then everyone would be able to access the content shown. Netflix are the original distributers of the TV series ‘House Of Cards’ and ‘Orange Is The New Black’ also ‘Making A Murderer’. No one else can watch these items if they do not pay for the subscription so if the Creative Commons licence was to happen then things like this wouldn’t be so specific and exclusive to Netflix.

The public would have more access to items they want to watch without any limitations which would shut companies down such as Netflix, Amazon Prime etc because they would not generate any money as everyone would be able to access things for free.

Do you think we should be able to access movies and TV series for free?

Netflix

netflix-logo
Netflix is a global streaming movies and TV series provider. It started as an American DVD mail service but moved online in 2007 and is now streaming to 109 countries with 75 million subscribers. Although you get a free month trial after that has ended then you have to pay a monthly fee for the content. There are 3 different packages available which are: basic (£5,99), standard (£7.49) and premium (£8.99).

If Netflix were under a Creative Commons licence then everyone would be able to access the content shown. Netflix are the original distributers of the TV series ‘House Of Cards’ and ‘Orange Is The New Black’ also ‘Making A Murderer’. No one else can watch these items if they do not pay for the subscription so if the Creative Commons licence was to happen then things like this wouldn’t be so specific and exclusive to Netflix.

The public would have more access to items they want to watch without any limitations which would shut companies down such as Netflix, Amazon Prime etc because they would not generate any money as everyone would be able to access things for free.

Do you think we should be able to access movies and TV series for free?

Are We Really Private Online?

I would like to think that I am a private person on the Internet. I use Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and many more social network platforms but I keep a lock on my security. I don’t like the idea of “hanging dirty laundry on social media”, so I keep my information shared with only friends that I know because that way people who I do not know won’t fine anything out about me. When Googling myself (which was for this blog post only!) I could not find any links to my social networking sites, which shows that there is not a lot of information about me on the Internet.

My Facebook has high privacy settings and is ‘White walled’ which means that anyone who I am a not friend with on Facebook will only see a blank white wall. I only accept people who I know on Facebook and I recently deleted a lot of people who I am not in contact with anymore. My Twitter is different because I hardly follow anyone that I know, I follow people who share the same interests as me. However I don’t post personal things about me on there and I have formed a lot of friendships through Twitter.

My Instagram is public which I know is bad as people can take your pictures and even make fake accounts of you however I hate it when someone I’m trying to find has their account as private which is why mine is not but I know that is not a good enough excuse! My LinkedIn is a competently different type of social media as I treat it like an online CV so I only connect with people in the radio industry because it may lead to things in the future.

I would like to end this blog post with a quote from ‘It’s complicated: The Social Lives Of Networked Teens’: “Just because teenagers use social media sites to connect with others doesn’t mean they don’t care about their privacy”. I feel that is defiantly correct in a lot of peoples circumstances especially mine.

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Reference: Boyd, d., (2014). It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, pp. 54-76.

Are We Really That Private?

I would like to think that I am a private person on the Internet. I use Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and many more social network platforms but I keep a lock on my security. I don’t like the idea of “hanging dirty laundry out on social media”, so I keep my information shared with only friends that I know because that way people who I do not know won’t fine anything out about me. When Googling myself (which was for this blog post only!) I could not find any links to my social networking sites, which shows that there is not a lot of information about me on the Internet.

My Facebook has high privacy settings and is ‘White walled’ which means that anyone who I am not a friend with on Facebook will only see a blank white wall. I only accept people who I know on Facebook and I recently deleted a lot of people who I am not in contact with anymore. My Twitter is different because I hardly follow anyone that I know, I follow people who share the same interests as me. However I don’t post personal things about me on there and I have formed a lot of friendships through Twitter.

My Instagram is public which I know is bad as people can take your pictures and even make fake accounts of you however I hate it when someone I’m trying to find has their account as private which is why mine is not but I know that is not a good enough excuse! My LinkedIn is a competently different type of social media as I treat it like an online CV so I only connect with people in the radio industry because it may lead to things in the future.

I would like to end this blog post with a quote from ‘It’s complicated: The Social Lives Of Networked Teens’: “Just because teenagers use social media sites to connect with others doesn’t mean they don’t care about their privacy”. I feel that is defiantly correct in a lot of peoples circumstances especially mine.

social media_134112389-thumb-380xauto-2431

Reference: Boyd, d., (2014). It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, pp. 54-76.

Basement Fam

Screen Shot 2016-02-07 at 21.00.43I am part of a few online communities so I have chosen to share the one I think is the most positive. It is called ‘The Basement’ and it is a group that originally was set up for people to buy and sell streetwear clothing items. Due to the community being such as success and gaining lots of members, everyone now describes it as ‘a family’.

In the book ‘Personal Connections In The Digital Age’, Baym says: “Online groups can open doors to people”. (Baym, 2013) ‘The Basement’ has done just that by setting up opportunities for people as the ‘leader’ of the group now has his own ‘Basement’ clothing range.

The book also describes how online communities can develop new relationships with people from different locations. Many members from ‘The Basement’ have met up and formed strong friendships with each other just because of the interest we all share.

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The Basement created their own pop up shop in London for a weekend so people could meet and buy merch

The members benefit from this community because of it’s original purpose to buy and sell clothes. On top of that they can benefit because people post projects and generate feedback from them for example photography or fashion students would post the work they have done and ask for our opinions. There are certain challenges from this online community which are clash of opinions, possible flaking from buyers (when someone pulls out from buying something) and you can get banned from the group with 3 strikes.

The book also explored how the term ‘online community’ is largely discussed and what community actually means. I think that ‘The Basement’ is the definition of an online community, what do you think?

References: Baym, N. K., (2010). Personal Connections in the Digital Age. Cambridge: Polity, pp. 138

The Basement:   https://www.facebook.com/groups/BasementApproved/?fref=ts

 

Gaming Feedback

Rainbow Six Siege is a first-person shooter game. The aim of the game is to disarm the boom, secure objectives and rescue hostages. The audience have shaped this because they released an ‘alpha’ version of the game. For those of you that don’t know an ‘alpha’ version is , it is an unfinished game so that people could play on it and then go and submit feedback on to the website in order to improve the game and say what content they would like to see in the game.

Personally, I believe that this is an excellent idea because with the feedback the audience provided, it means that the creators of the game can shape the content exactly how the audience wants it. By doing that then the audience will be more satisfied and enjoy it more.

The feedback from the community was significant as they solved problems within the games such as the technical issue of fixing ‘bugs’ and the game also fixed the problem of balancing weapons which means none of them were overpowered.

The manufactures of the game released a statement: “We wanted to address the things that you cared about the most based on your experience from this testing period. Thank you again for your participation and we can’t wait to see what you think during the Closed Beta”. (Ubisoft, 2015)

In the future who knows this might become a regular thing to the point where we are working for the media and not even realising it. How far can it go?

Reference: http://rainbow6.ubi.com/siege/en-gb/news/detail.aspx?c=tcm:152-202297-16&ct=tcm:148-76770-32